The Loonaverse: semantic deconstructivism and expressionism – A very serious academic essay by Kpopalypse

Many Kpopalypse readers have been wondering about k-pop girl group Loona’s supposed “lore”, or “The Loonaverse”.  What is it?  Why does it exist?  What does it all mean?  Is there cake?  This post has the answers!

We’ve all seen those essays around the k-pop-bothering Internet about The Loonaverse, Loona’s supposed “lore” which basically just consists of Blockberry spamming random phrases and iconography David Lynch style, and then sitting back as they let the group’s fanbase basically write their own amateurish “lore” on the company’s behalf… but is that what’s really happening?  Obviously there’s a lot of conflicting theories out there, and a lot of people are fairly obviously just making stuff up – but wouldn’t it be nice if someone actually had the truth and was able to increase understanding of the true nature of the Loonaverse?  With that in mind, please read the following essay that I’ve prepared for you, my lovely readers!

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The Loonaverse: semantic deconstructivism and expressionism

A very serious academic essay by Kpopalypse


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1. Contexts of rubicon

If one examines the Loonaverse, one is faced with a choice: either accept textual objectivism or conclude that the media is part of the defining characteristic of sexuality, given that the premise of expressionism is invalid. Derridaist reading implies that language serves to exploit minorities. Therefore, Blockberry uses the term ‘the Loonaverse’ to denote the meaninglessness, and some would say the economy, of postcultural sexual identity.

The characteristic theme of the works of Loona is the role of the poet as observer. The subject is interpolated into a dialectic discourse that includes art as a reality. But Lyotard uses the term ‘Marxist class’ to denote not desituationism, but predesituationism.  Lyotard’s model of expressionism holds that narrative must come from the masses, but only if narrativity is equal to reality; if that is not the case, the task of the reader is deconstruction. In a sense, Lyotard uses the term ‘neocapitalist theory’ to denote a textual whole.

If expressionism holds, the works of Loona are reminiscent of Mapplethorpe. However, several materialisms concerning not narrative, as Sartre would have it, but subnarrative exist. Blockberry suggests the use of the Loonaverse to modify and challenge class. It could be said that la Fournier[1] suggests that we have to choose between dialectic discourse and semanticist subdialectic theory.  Blockberry promotes the use of the Loonaverse to attack sexism.  Thus, the within/without distinction depicted in Yves’ New, emerges again in Chuu’s Heart Attack.

2. Blockberry and the cultural paradigm of context

“Sexual identity is dead,” says Marx; however, according to Wilson[2] , it is not so much sexual identity that is dead, but rather the failure, and subsequent fatal flaw, of sexual identity. The main theme of Geoffrey’s[3] essay on expressionism is the futility, and eventually the absurdity, of postcapitalist class. However, the premise of dialectic discourse states that sexual identity, somewhat paradoxically, has intrinsic meaning.

“Class is part of the failure of culture,” says Derrida. The primary theme of the works of Loona is not, in fact, appropriation, but neoappropriation. Thus, if expressionism holds, the works of Loona are not postmodern.

If one examines textual objectivism, one is faced with a choice: either reject expressionism or conclude that sexuality is a legal fiction. Bailey[4] implies that we have to choose between Marxist capitalism and the dialectic paradigm of expression. It could be said that the characteristic theme of Brophy’s[5] model of dialectic discourse is a self-sufficient reality.

The subject is contextualised into a Loonaverse that includes narrativity as a totality. But Foucault uses the term ‘expressionism’ to denote the rubicon of prestructuralist sexual identity.  The subject is interpolated into a Sartreist existentialism that includes culture as a whole. Thus, Blockberry uses the term ‘the Loonaverse’ to denote the common ground between society and sexual identity.

The subject is contextualised into a dialectic discourse that includes truth as a paradox. Therefore, Marx suggests the use of the textual paradigm of context to modify class.  The Loonaverse therefore holds that the raison d’etre of the participant is social comment, but only if the premise of expressionism is valid. In a sense, an abundance of theories concerning postcultural textual theory may be discovered. 

Dialectic discourse implies that society has significance. Thus, a number of desituationisms concerning a presemantic whole exist. The paradigm, and hence the absurdity, of expressionism intrinsic to Love Choerry Motion is also evident in Egoist, although in a more self-referential sense. Thus, Choerry promotes the use of dialectic discourse to deconstruct sexism.  Lacan suggests the use of expressionism to challenge and read sexuality.  The subject is interpolated into the Loonaverse so that it includes truth as a totality.

3. Consensuses of stasis

The main theme of the works of Loona is not narrative, as cultural deconstructivism suggests, but postnarrative. If the Loonaverse holds, we have to choose between expressionism and preconceptual socialism. In a sense, the primary theme of Hubbard’s[6] essay on capitalist narrative is the role of the poet as writer.

If one examines the Loonaverse, one is faced with a choice: either accept expressionism or conclude that culture is used to entrench class divisions. In Kiss Later, Yeojin reiterates the postconstructivist paradigm of expression; although, in Let Me In, Haseul affirms expressionism. However, Derrida’s critique of semantic deconstructivism holds that the purpose of the poet is deconstruction.

Sartre uses the term ‘capitalist theory’ to denote a mythopoetical whole.  Thus, the world of the Loonaverse implies that language serves to disempower the proletariat, given that consciousness is interchangeable with culture.

Many narratives concerning dialectic discourse may be revealed. But Blockberry promotes the use of the Loonaverse to attack capitalism.

4. Loona and neostructural textual theory

“Sexual identity is part of the collapse of art,” says Baudrillard; however, according to Hanfkopf[7] , it is not so much sexual identity that is part of the collapse of art, but rather the failure of sexual identity. Any number of theories concerning the fatal flaw, and eventually the meaninglessness, of capitalist class exist. It could be said that the subject is contextualised into a dialectic discourse that includes culture as a paradox.

“Society is unattainable,” says Marx. Foucault suggests the use of neodialectic semioticist theory to modify class. Thus, the subject is interpolated into a Loonaverse that includes reality as a totality. If one examines dialectic discourse, one is faced with a choice: either reject the Loonaverse or conclude that narrativity, perhaps surprisingly, has objective value. Sartre uses the term ‘precultural construction’ to denote the role of the artist as reader. But in Everyday, I Love You, Blockberry analyses expressionism; in Eclipse, however, they deny dialectic discourse.

A number of discourses concerning structuralist socialism may be found. Thus, the subject is contextualised into a expressionism that includes truth as a whole.  Any number of demodernisms concerning the dialectic, and thus the failure, of postdialectic class exist. However, Foucault promotes the use of semantic deconstructivism to challenge the status quo.

Sontag uses the term ‘expressionism’ to denote a textual totality. It could be said that Wilson[8] states that we have to choose between the Loonaverse and capitalist materialism.

The subject is interpolated into a expressionism that includes art as a whole. But if predialectic theory holds, we have to choose between semantic deconstructivism and cultural subdeconstructivist theory.

5. Consensuses of fatal flaw

“Consciousness is part of the failure of reality,” says Foucault. Lyotard uses the term ‘dialectic discourse’ to denote the role of the poet as writer. In a sense, the premise of cultural nationalism suggests that government is dead, but only if the Loonaverse is invalid; otherwise, Loona’s model of expressionism is one of “posttextual desublimation”, and therefore part of the meaninglessness of consciousness.

“Society is elitist,” says Derrida; however, according to Yuria[9], it is not so much society that is elitist, but rather the futility, and subsequent rubicon, of society. Wilson[10] states that we have to choose between the Loonaverse and the capitalist paradigm of context. But the subject is contextualised into a expressionism that includes art as a reality.

If one examines subcultural feminism, one is faced with a choice: either accept the Loonaverse or conclude that culture is capable of significance. If expressionism holds, the works of Loona are modernistic. However, Bataille uses the term ‘the Loonaverse’ to denote the stasis, and eventually the economy, of capitalist class. The example of expressionism depicted in Go Won’s One&Only emerges again in Loona yyxy’s Love4eva. Therefore, Lacan uses the term ‘dialectic discourse’ to denote not theory, but pretheory.

Hanfkopf[11] implies that we have to choose between expressionism and the neoconstructivist paradigm of discourse. However, Baudrillard suggests the use of dialectic discourse to deconstruct and read sexual identity.  If expressionism holds, we have to choose between dialectic discourse and capitalist Marxism. But the subject is interpolated into a semantic deconstructivism that includes sexuality as a paradox.

Loona promotes the use of pretextual discourse to challenge elitist perceptions of language. However, Sargeant[12] states that we have to choose between the Loonaverse and cultural subdeconstructivist theory.

6. Blockberry and expressionism

“Society is fundamentally meaningless,” says Baudrillard; however, according to Bailey[13] , it is not so much society that is fundamentally meaningless, but rather the collapse, and subsequent defining characteristic, of society. The subject is contextualised into a dialectic discourse that includes narrativity as a whole. Therefore, if the cultural paradigm of expression holds, the works of Loona are reminiscent of Pynchon.

“Class is elitist,” says Marx. Many theories concerning expressionism may be revealed. However, the main theme of the works of Loona is the role of the reader as observer.

If one examines dialectic discourse, one is faced with a choice: either reject postmodernist discourse or conclude that the establishment is part of the rubicon of culture. Lyotard suggests the use of dialectic discourse to analyse sexual identity. It could be said that Sartre’s essay on expressionism suggests that the task of the participant is significant form. The characteristic theme of Reicher’s[14] analysis of dialectic discourse is a mythopoetical totality. But any number of desituationisms concerning the difference between language and society exist.  Fukada[15] states that we have to choose between expressionism and textual theory. In a sense, the subject is interpolated into a dialectic discourse that includes the Loonaverse as a reality. If expressionism holds, we have to choose between the Loonaverse and Foucaultist power relations. Therefore, several deconstructions concerning postdialectic conceptual theory may be found.

The closing/opening distinction which is a central theme of Loona’s Hi High is also evident in Star, although in a more self-supporting sense. It could be said that Bataille uses the term ‘expressionism’ to denote the role of the writer as reader. The premise of neotextual discourse holds that context comes from communication, given that sexuality is distinct from reality. However, the primary theme of the works of Blockberry is not narrative per se, but subnarrative.

Debord uses the term ‘dialectic discourse’ to denote the bridge between class and sexual identity. Thus, Pickett[16] states that the works of Loona are an example of mythopoetical feminism. The subject is contextualised into a Loonaverse that includes sexuality as a whole. However, if the semanticist paradigm of context holds, we have to choose between dialectic discourse and neodialectic discourse.

7. Consensuses of stasis

“Reality is dead,” says Lyotard. The subject is interpolated into a expressionism that includes sexuality as a totality. It could be said that an abundance of theories concerning the role of the poet as observer exist.

The main theme of Cameron’s[17] critique of the conceptual paradigm of reality is the paradigm of subsemanticist class. Baudrillard’s essay on dialectic discourse holds that the purpose of the artist is deconstruction. Therefore, the example of conceptual narrative depicted in Loona 1/3’s Love & Live emerges again in Odd Eye Circle’s Girl Front.

In the works of Fellini, a predominant concept is the distinction between without and within. Parry[18] suggests that we have to choose between dialectic discourse and presemioticist libertarianism. But the subject is contextualised into a expressionism that includes language as a paradox. “Sexual identity is part of the collapse of art,” says Bataille; however, according to Sargeant[19] , it is not so much sexual identity that is part of the collapse of art, but rather the defining characteristic, and hence the collapse, of sexual identity. The primary theme of the works of Fellini is a self-falsifying reality. Therefore, a number of discourses concerning the Loonaverse may be discovered.

In the works of Loona, a predominant concept is the concept of dialectic sexuality. The characteristic theme of Hubbard’s[20] model of Foucaultist power relations is the difference between class and reality. However, Lacan uses the term ‘dialectic discourse’ to denote a pretextual totality. In a sense, Lacan uses the term to denote the role of the reader as participant. Thus, the premise of dialectic discourse implies that narrativity is intrinsically elitist.  The main theme of the works of Loona is the failure, and eventually the collapse, of postsemantic society. But the subject is interpolated into a textual subdialectic theory that includes truth as a whole.  The Loonaverse states that class has intrinsic meaning. Therefore, if expressionism holds, the works of Loona are not postmodern. Marx uses the term ‘cultural theory’ to denote the common ground between consciousness and society. It could be said that the subject is contextualised into a Loonaverse that includes art as a paradox.

Lacan uses the term ‘expressionism’ to denote not, in fact, narrative, but neonarrative. However, several deconceptualisms concerning a self-supporting whole exist. La Tournier[21] holds that we have to choose between dialectic discourse and the cultural paradigm of consensus. But Blockberry promotes the use of the Loonaverse to attack the status quo. The subject is interpolated into a dialectic discourse that includes truth as a totality.

8. Postcapitalist textual theory and neosemioticist discourse

If one examines the Loonaverse, one is faced with a choice: either accept expressionism or conclude that the collective is capable of significant form, but only if Baudrillard’s analysis of dialectic nationalism is valid. The fatal flaw, and therefore the meaninglessness, of neosemioticist discourse prevalent in Loona’s PTT is also evident in Why Not?, although in a more mythopoetical sense. Therefore, Lyotard uses the term ‘expressionism’ to denote not theory, but subtheory.

“Class is part of the dialectic of culture,” says Lacan. The characteristic theme of Matsumoto’s[22] model of the Loonaverse is a postpatriarchialist reality. But Derrida suggests the use of cultural deappropriation to read and challenge sexual identity.  In the works of Loona, a predominant concept is the distinction between feminine and masculine. The subject is contextualised into a semantic deconstructivism that includes art as a paradox. Therefore, if the neosemioticist paradigm of discourse holds, we have to choose between semantic deconstructivism and dialectic rationalism. Hanfkopf[23] states that the works of Loona are postmodern. But the primary theme of the works of Loona is not discourse, but postdiscourse. Lyotard uses the term ‘subdeconstructivist theory’ to denote a mythopoetical totality. Thus, the creation/destruction distinction intrinsic to Loona’s So What emerges again in Why Not?

The characteristic theme of Scuglia’s[24] critique of neosemioticist discourse is the bridge between sexual identity and society. It could be said that the Loonaverse holds that expression is a product of the masses.  In Hula Hoop, Loona denies neosemioticist discourse. But if the Loonaverse holds, we have to choose between expressionism and textual demodernism.


1. la Fournier, M. S. (1990) Nihilism, precapitalist libertarianism and expressionism. And/Or Press
2. Wilson, E. ed. (1982) Reinventing Social realism: Expressionism and semantic deconstructivism. Panic Button Books
3. Geoffrey, T. F. I. (1979) Cultural narrative, expressionism and nihilism. University of Oregon Press
4. Bailey, B. ed. (1980) Forgetting Bataille: Semantic deconstructivism and expressionism. Harvard University Press
5. Brophy, H. O. U. (1999) Expressionism in the works of Pynchon. And/Or Press
6. Hubbard, D. ed. (1981) The Collapse of Discourse: Semantic deconstructivism in the works of Rushdie. Schlangekraft
7. Hanfkopf, E. I. (1972) Expressionism and semantic deconstructivism. Oxford University Press
8. Wilson, M. S. M. ed. (1993) Subconceptualist Theories: Expressionism in the works of Smith. Loompanics
9. Yuria, Y. (2021) Married Woman Visits Rundown Dwelling To Enjoy 30 Days Of Sex With Single Men With Thick Sperm For The Sake of Her Seedless Husband HMN-101. Hon Naka
10. Wilson, A. O. H. ed. (1997) Deconstructing Foucault: Nihilism, expressionism and neodialectic feminism. University of California Press
11. Hanfkopf, F. W. (1973) Expressionism in the works of Glass. University of Georgia Press
12. Sargeant, V. ed. (1998) The Defining characteristic of Narrative: Nihilism, Debordist situation and expressionism. Loompanics
13. Bailey, S. Q. H. (1985) Semantic deconstructivism in the works of Yua Mikami. Schlangekraft
14. Reicher, A. I. ed. (1998) Dialectic Narratives: Expressionism in the works of Koons. University of Michigan Press
15. Fukada, E. (2019) I’ll Protect You From The Bullies, So In Exchange I Want You To Be My After School Sex Slave PRED-175. Premium
16. Pickett, E. ed. (1978) Narratives of Collapse: Expressionism in the works of Fellini. Schlangekraft
17. Cameron, O. T. (1995) Expressionism and semantic deconstructivism. Loompanics
18. Parry, Z. ed. (1983) The Failure of Society: Expressionism, nihilism and Derridaist reading. University of Massachusetts Press
19. Sargeant, Q. H. W. (1976) Semantic deconstructivism and expressionism. Schlangekraft
20. Hubbard, C. D. ed. (1990) Reassessing Modernism: Expressionism in the works of Joyce. Harvard University Press
21. la Tournier, R. (1978) Expressionism and semantic deconstructivism. University of Illinois Press
22. Matsumoto, I. (2020) The Job: Stuff A Girl Into A Delivery Bag And Deliver Her To A Perverted Client Who Enjoys Rough Sex SDDE-630. Soft On Demand
23. Hanfkopf, N. (1987) Semantic deconstructivism in the works of Joyce. And/Or Press
24. Scuglia, L. Y. ed. (1972) The Stasis of Reality: Expressionism in the works of Glass. Loompanics

That’s all for this post!  Kpopalypse will return!

6 thoughts on “The Loonaverse: semantic deconstructivism and expressionism – A very serious academic essay by Kpopalypse

  1. Ah fuck me I thought I left my critical theory shit in college. How in the entire world do you even remember any of these words I literally forgot everything the day I graduated.

  2. the fact that you spent time to figure out how to procedurally generate this shows that you love ’em really aww… ❤

  3. I only made it to “Derridaist reading” before involuntarily muttering “ah you cunt”, but i guess its difficult to squirt out this much delectable dialectic diarrhoea if you spend too many paragraphs lulling us into the security of Bosom-berry.

    Anyway I searched for no more than the first 4 article titles before Sage / Jstor / Google started their own party. Somehow even though neoappropriation isn’t a word, “Cultural Appropriation in Contemporary Neopaganism and Witchcraft” is, and is mere clicks away from neoliberal feminism.

    I only have myself to blame for this headache.

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